Signs of spring: Flower bulb research at Ken Post Lab greenhouses.

Signs of spring: Flower bulb research at Ken Post Lab greenhouses.

Horticulture grad student Maria Gannett presents soil health poster at SIPS recruitment weekend.

Horticulture grad student Maria Gannett presents soil health poster at SIPS recruitment weekend.

Signs of spring: Flower bulb research at Ken Post Lab greenhouses.

Flower bulb research at Ken Post Lab greenhouses.

Hands-on Horticulture students create flower arrangements.

Hands-on Horticulture students create flower arrangements.

Who we are

As the only horticulture program in the Ivy League, our faculty, staff and students work to shape the food systems and landscapes of today and tomorrow.

If you've ever been shaded by trees on a city street, enjoyed an apple in winter, visited a farmer's market or watched a sporting event on natural grass, then it is likely you have been touched by our work.

Our faculty includes more than 40 scientists working across New York to make discoveries and share knowledge about fruits, vegetables and landscape plants. They are called on by farmers, golf course managers, urban foresters, government officials and many others to solve problems around the globe.

News

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Free iBooks will make your lawn ‘green’

lawn care cover
Published: 
Apr 9, 2015
With the grass finally starting to green up in the Northeast, two new iBooks from Cornell University will help you turn your lawn into an environmental asset — as well as a beautiful place to relax and play. Read more

Study: Soil microbiome influences plant flowering time

 Kevin Panke-Buisse
Published: 
Apr 3, 2015
Cornell University researchers have discovered that it is possible to alter plant flowering time and other traits by manipulating soil microbial communities, a finding that they ultimately hope will help reduce crop inputs on everything from greenhouse plants to agronomic crops. Read more

Titan Arum blooms again

titan arum
The Titan Arum (Amorphophallus titanum) produces the largest unbranched inflorescences (flower structures) in the Plant Kingdom.  One of Cornell's specimens dubbed 'Wee Stinky' – part of the Plant Biology Section’s Liberty Hyde Bailey Hortorium collection – flowered for the second time November 19. Learn more about this very special plant at the Titan Arum blog.